Tag Archives: sponsorship

Grace thrives in town of Gilgil

Ten years ago, Grace’s life was turned upside down. After a controversial election, political unrest in her home country of Kenya was at an all-time high. Violent riots were breaking out in many towns. Her hometown of Eldoret, was no longer a safe place for her family.

Grace made the difficult decision to leave her life in Eldoret behind, and flee to Gilgil, a safer area of Kenya. Grace’s husband, however, didn’t agree with her choice, and deserted the family. Grace moved alone with her children to Gilgil to start anew. Rebuilding was difficult- she was struggling to get reestablished, and couldn’t provide enough food to feed her children.

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Elder sponsorship brings joy to Viviana

 

When Viviana González was a little girl, she inherited a very special talent from her mother. She learned the beautiful art of weaving ñanduti, a rare, artisanal fabric found only in her hometown of Itauguá, Paraguay. Viviana’s still an avid weaver, and she doesn’t let her age of 81 slow her down.

Every morning, Viviana walks four kilometers to the market to stock up on crafting materials, and to buy herself enough food for her daily nutrition. Before she was sponsored, however, Vivian could barely afford what she needed to keep afloat.

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Sharon soars to new heights

Sharon grew up in a large, loving family in Kakamega County in western Kenya. She has an older sister, and three younger siblings. Her parents worked as manual laborers, putting in long hours to provide for their children. In 2001, Sharon’s father passed away suddenly from a heart attack, leaving the family devastated. Sharon’s mother, left to raise her five children alone, could barely provide enough food to feed the family, and struggled to pay school fees.

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Ireen achieves her teaching dream

Ireen from Zambia, Africa, had a difficult childhood. When her father passed away, her mother couldn’t afford to care for her children with her small income as a housekeeper. She sent her four children, including Ireen, to live with their grandfather. He also had trouble providing everything the children needed, and often could not afford their school fees. “I started at Kasisi Primary School when I was five, but had no one to pay for my school fees,” she recalls. Irene wasn’t able to regularly attend school for many years.

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Hilda at Amanacer Site Tells Her Own Story

Hilda lives at the Mother of God girls’ home and attends the St Vincent de Paul School, part of Chalice’s Amanacer Site in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Hilda is not sponsored by Chalice, but the school and home receive support from our programs. She wrote her story, in Spanish, and wanted to give it to me when I visited her school. She gave me permission to share it with Canadians at home. A little punctuation has been added to the translation for clarity, but otherwise remains intact. 

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“Give A Man a Fish…”

Power for a sewing machine: 220 volts. Power for a chainsaw: 58 volts. Power for an oven: 240 volts. Power for a man or woman to earn a consistent, competitive daily wage: stronger than the sun!

Unemployment among parents is a consistent issue across all of Chalice’s sites. Finding daily wage work (such as agricultural labour) is challenging and often seasonal, and permanent positions a pipe dream to many. Naturally, many people become entrepreneurs, making use of their skills and available resources to start a small business – be it a handicraft, or a service, or an agricultural endeavour.

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Talk About Street Art!

On my first day in Kumbakonam, the town where Chalice’s Tamil Site is based, my colleagues and I took an evening stroll through a residential neighborhood. I kept seeing chalk designs on the ground in front of the house’s doorway. Some simple, some more elaborate.

 

My colleague explained to me that this practice is called rangoli, or sometimes kolam. Residents, often women and girls, will draw fresh ones in the mornings and evenings in front of their homes. At times, such as on special occasions or during festivals, the designs will have specific means or honour specific deities. Sometimes they are just decorative and an opportunity to get creative.

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